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I am a wife, mother and grandma who enjoys the many aspects of homemaking. A variety of interests and hobbies combined with travel keep me active. They reflect the importance of family, friends, home and good food.
Cook ingredients that you are used to cooking by other techniques, such as fish, chicken, or hamburgers. In other words be comfortable with the ingredients you are using.
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Friday, August 21, 2009

Three Hot Pepper Jellies

My garden is producing nicely which means along with other produce I have an abundant and steady supply of hot peppers. I made three different small batches of hot pepper jelly last Wednesday. All were made with various hot peppers from my garden.

Hungarian Wax peppers, Banana peppers, long red slim cayenne pepper, cherry tomatoesFrom the Garden

Pictured are a few peppers and cherry tomatoes from my garden. On the left there is Sweet Banana peppers and a Red Long Slim cayenne pepper. Hungarian wax peppers (hot) are on the right. One website said it is difficult to tell the difference between the Sweet banana peppers and the Hungarian wax peppers other than taste. I beg to differ with this opinion. On the plants the two peppers look quite different. The Hungarian wax peppers are a deeper yellow and a straighter pepper. The Sweet banana peppers are a paler greenish yellow with rather distinctive wrinkling, bumping and curling. Even though Hungarian wax peppers are a hot pepper they really are rather mild in terms of heat. They are usually harvested when yellow and about the length of your palm. If left on the plant they will mature to a nice red colour. Both Hungarian wax and Sweet banana peppers can be used in stews and salads or made into jellies. Both are good roasted.

hot pepper jelliesHot Pepper Jellies

Pictured are the hot pepper jellies: jalapeno jelly (1), hot pepper jelly (2) and basil banana pepper jelly (3). Each are slightly different yet the flavour of each is quite unique. I really like the flavour hot pepper jelly (2)! I tweaked this recipe to include both Hungarian Wax peppers (hot) and sweet banana peppers. I think they all look pretty in the jars but I'm a bit partial. As with most jams and jellies I make these jellies have been modified to use Pomona's Universal Pectin because it is considerably cheaper than regular pectin and I can adjust the amount of sugar or sweetener used. It also gives consistently good jelling unlike regular pectin. Here are the recipes.

Basil Banana Pepper Jelly

½ c thinly sliced Hungarian Wax yellow peppers
¼ c thinly sliced hot banana peppers
3 - 4 large basil leaves, cut into ribbons
¼ tsp dried basil
¾ c white wine vinegar
3 c organic sugar
½ tsp Pomona's pectin
1 tsp calcium water

Mix peppers, basils, vinegar and calcium water in a saucepan. Mix sugar and pectin in a separate bowl. Bring the pepper mixture to a boil. Stir in sugar mixture. Bring to a boil, stirring well and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat. Pour into hot, sterilized jars. Wipe rims and adjust 2 piece lids. Process 5 minutes in BWB canner at altitudes up to 1,000 feet above sea level. For higher altitudes, please refer to the altitude adjustment chart (here).
Yield: 3 - 250 ml (half pint) jars

Hot Pepper Jelly

1 c finely chopped red bell peppers
¾ c finely chopped green bell peppers
2 tbsp finely chopped jalapeno peppers
¼ c finely chopped Hungarian Wax peppers
¼ c finely chopped hot banana peppers
½ c cider vinegar
2½ c organic sugar
1¼ tsp Pomona's pectin
2½ tsp calcium water

Mix peppers, vinegar and calcium water in a saucepan. Mix sugar and pectin in a separate bowl. Bring the pepper mixture to a boil. Stir in sugar mixture. Bring to a boil, stirring well and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat. Pour into hot, sterilized jars. Wipe rims and adjust 2 piece lids. Process 5 minutes in BWB canner at altitudes up to 1,000 feet above sea level. For higher altitudes, please refer to the altitude adjustment chart (here).
Yield: 3 - 250 ml (half pint) jars

Jalapeno Jelly

1 c finely chopped green pepper
¼ c finely chopped jalapeno peppers
3½ c organic sugar
1 c cider vinegar
⅝ tsp Pomona's pectin
1¼ tsp calcium water

Mix peppers, vinegar and calcium water in a saucepan. Mix sugar and pectin in a separate bowl. Bring the pepper mixture to a boil. Stir in sugar mixture. Bring to a boil, stirring well and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat. Pour into hot, sterilized jars. Wipe rims and adjust 2 piece lids. Process 5 minutes in BWB canner at altitudes up to 1,000 feet above sea level. For higher altitudes, please refer to the altitude adjustment chart (here).
Yield: 3 - 250 ml (half pint) jars


18 food lovers commented:

Lola said...

Can I ask what you use the Pepper Jellies for? How do you serve them, what do you serve them with?

Garden Gnome said...

Hi Lola! Hot pepper jellies can be used as a condiment for meats, poultry and fish. However, they are an ideal ingredient for appetizers. Spread cream cheese on a cracker with substance something like cracked wheat then add a dollop of hot pepper jelly. They are quite delightful and a popular appetizer during the Christmas holidays. An alternative presentation is to place a block of softened cream cheese on a serving plate then spoon hot pepper jelly over it then serve with a variety of crackers on the side. Include a small butter knife for easy self serving.

John | English Wilderness said...

The pepper jellies sound fantastic. I bet they'd go really well with my cheese and biscuits :-)

CyberCelt said...

Pepper jam. Now I have not heard of that for a long time. I had a girlfriend who used to can and she swore by the pepper jelies. We would eat them on chips, crackers and make a dip mixed with cream cheese.

Garden Gnome said...

Hi Cyber Celt :) The hot pepper jelly is delicious this way! They make such a yummy yet easy appetizer that always goes over well.

ConnieFoggles said...

I'm not sure if I've eaten Sweet Banana peppers, but there's a type of pepper that I use when I make sausage and peppers. It's not hot. It looks different from the photo though. Used to be able to eat hot peppers but not any more. There's nothing like fresh veggies from the garden!

Anonymous said...

Those look great! Do you know any hot pepper varieties that do okay as pot plants? I would love to grow some but do not have a garden :(

p.

Emm said...

Oooo, yummy. I haven't made jam, jelly or condiments since school.

Garden Gnome said...

Hi p. and thanks for visiting. In general most pepper varieties will grow well in containers. The plants tend to be rather compact with the larger varieties getting larger of course but nothing a 5 gal container couldn't handle. If growing in containers you will need to use organic fertilizer and epsom salt.

Saphrym said...

Very cool stuff! I saw a lot of this when I lived in Louisiana. They love their peppers there in any form. Heck, I even make "Snowballs from Heck", which are chocolates with a jalapeno/chocolate filling. Sweet but then the burn hits. Quite cool though.

Garden Gnome said...

Hi A and thanks for visiting. Hot pepper strength (heat) and flavour are determined by their varieties so it does matter what variety you use. The calcium water is a solution made from monocalcium phosphate which comes with the Pomona's pectin. Pomona's pectin does not require sugar to gel like other pectins which makes it ideal for low sugar products. It does however require the calcium water.

Cynicalelf said...

Love those recipes and am going to try them soon.

I live in the GTA (Whitby) and wondered where do you buy your Pamona Pectin?

Garden Gnome said...

Hi Cynicalelf and thanks for visiting. I'm in Ontario as well and orden Pomona's pectin directly from them. Their website is http://www.pomonapectin.com If you get the the Kitchener/Waterloo or St. Jacobs area you will likely be able to find Pomona's pectin in one of the Amish or Mennonite shops.

Anonymous said...

Someone asked about growing peppers in pots. I've got a Long Slim cayenne just finishing up the second season in a pot. I planted it in a pot in the Spring of 2009. I brought it inside for the 2009/2010 winter and kept it growing all winter under a fluorescent grow light. ( Not the best use of electricity, but fun). I took it outside in the Spring of 2010 fully loaded with peppers. The pot was, I guess, about a 3.5 to 4 gallon clay pot. I might try to keep it over this winter as well, just as an experiment.

I am not much for heat, and these are hot. But, I do like seeing nice red peppers on a big plant in the middle of winter inside! Illinois, USA.

virginia said...

Hello, I love the recipe you have listed for jalapeno jelly with pomona's pectin. Do you have any recipes for fruit jalapeno jellies, like cranberry or peach? I am new to canning, so listed out ingredients work best for me:)

Anonymous said...

Hi. I tried your hot pepper jelly. It wasn't "jelly" but it was thick. Is that how it is supposed to be? I used pomona. I love that stuff.

Debbe

Garden Gnome said...

Hi Anonymous, the jelly should come out very thick, more like an actual jelly. Depending on your altitude you could try adding more Pomona's. Sometimes you have to play around with Pomona's to get the desired set you want.

Melissa said...

I was wondering why you use more green peppers than jalapeƱo peppers in the receipt, is it because it would be too hot?